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What Happens if You Can’t Pay Your Court Fines?

What Happens if You Can't Pay Your Court Fines?

In 2016, 95% of warrants Texas courts issued arose from unpaid court fines. While being in debt is not a crime in and of itself, failure to pay court fines can effectively land you in jail. If you are facing court fines, fees and penalties, being able to pay is a top concern. But if you can’t pay, what happens?

 

Facing the Penalties

 

When the court fines you for a traffic citation or a low-level offense, paying that fine is a penalty for your conviction. Like community service or jail time, you must pay those fines to satisfy the requirements of your sentence. If you don’t fulfill that requirement, you could potentially face jail time. You might be able to make payment arrangements, but you could incur additional fines if you default on your payment and don’t contact the court. You could also face arrest and even lose your license, which could affect your ability to make a living. In light of these facts, it’s easy to see how court-issued fines can effectively perpetuate the cycle of crime for defendants who lack financial resources.

 

Driven by recently passed legislation, Texas courts are making changes to give low-income defendants the break they need. To lessen the disproportionate burden court fines place on low-income Texans, judges must now offer low-income defendants community service in lieu of fines. Judges are also granted the power to reduce or waive fines if they would place an undue burden on the defendant.

 

Texas courts extend this option only to defendants convicted of low-level crimes. Defendants who do not qualify as low-income or those fined for more serious offenses (which typically carry more serious fines) could face arrest for failure to pay.

 

If you have unpaid court fines, even just a traffic ticket you forgot about, we can’t stress the importance of speaking with a Dallas traffic ticket and criminal defense attorney enough. Before you pay those fines, talk to an attorney about your options. By paying a traffic ticket, you are essentially pleading guilty, which results in a conviction. Even if you pay your fine, the Texas Department of Public Safety will add points to your driving record, and you could face surcharges and increased insurance rates. You could even lose your job if you are a CDL holder. If you have an unpaid court fine for a low-level offense, you could have a warrant out of your arrest. An attorney can play a crucial role here in getting you out of hot water without having the bear the burden of excessive court fines.

 

If you are facing court fines in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action to clear your name and remove any warrants. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

Punishment for Drug Possession: Why Quantity and Penalty Group Matter

Punishment for Drug Possession: Why Quantity and Penalty Group Matter

Simple Drug Possession Isn’t Simple

 

The State of Texas maintains some of this nation’s strictest drug possession laws. In Texas, you can face long periods of incarceration and steep fines for even simple drug possession charges. Drug possession offenses vary by the drug type—also called the penalty group or “schedule”—and the quantity, or the amount you had. These factors provide guidelines for how to charge and sentence offenders.

 

Quantity and Type

 

The law divides controlled substances into types or “schedules” that classify drugs based on numerous factors, such as the potential for misuse and dependency. Under the Texas Health and Safety Code, possession of a controlled substance is punishable by:

 

  • A minimum of confinement in jail for no more than 180 days, a fine of up to $2,000 or both.
  • A maximum of confinement under the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for no less than ten years and no more than 99 years or life and a fine of up to $100,000.

 

As you can see, the punishment range is vast. The type (i.e. penalty group) and the quantity of the drug are the two factors that determine whether you will get just a fine or up to life in prison. There are four main drug penalty groups. For example, penalty group one contains substances like opiates (synthetic and natural) and penalty group 4 contains substances like over the counter cough remedies. The quantity factor is measured in grams, ounces, pounds, tons or “abuse units,” depending on the specific drug type. For example, drugs in penalty group one are measured in grams.

 

Most forms of simple possession of controlled substances in small amounts (again, relative to the type) are state jail felonies. Possession of more significant amounts in type-specific units of measurement is punishable by much longer sentences in addition to exorbitant fines.

 

Penalties for Possession of a Controlled Substance

 

 

The penalties for drug possession in Texas are nothing to laugh about. For this reason, you need to speak with a Dallas-Fort Worth drug charge defense attorney experienced in handling drug cases if you are facing possession charges or any drug-related charge. An attorney can evaluate the facts and circumstances of your offense and walk you through the potential penalties you could face. A conviction for drug possession can result in a long incarceration period in addition to huge fines, so it’s well worth your time to consult with a knowledgeable attorney to learn about what you can do to fight your charges.

 

If you are facing charges for possession of a controlled substance in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action given your circumstances. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

5 Tips for Meeting Your Community Supervision Requirements

5 Tips for Meeting Your Community Supervision Requirements

Community supervision (i.e. probation) seems like a break, at least initially. In lieu of jail time, you are permitted to go back to your normal life, albeit under close watch. For those facing criminal charges, community supervision may seem highly desirable. But don’t be fooled. The requirements you must meet to successfully comply with and complete your community supervision are likely to be strict. So, if you think you’re getting off easy, think again. Meeting those requirements will take sacrifices of your time, money, privacy and peace of mind. To help you meet those requirements, read through these five tips for those on community supervision in Texas.

 

Make Your Probation Officer’s Job Easier

 

You will be required to check in with your probation officer periodically (generally once per month). Always bear in mind that your probation officer is dealing with a subset of the population that does not complete tasks timely, and is probably not easy to interact with. You can make your life and your probation officer’s life far easier by not skylining yourself. How is that accomplished? Make his or her job easier by being on time, doing what you’re told to do and being polite. And don’t even think about complaining about your sentence or the requirements of your community supervision. Finally, complete all of your classes and community service early. You have to do them anyway, and they don’t get any easier with time. If you knock these items out early, you’ll soon find yourself on your probation officer’s pay no mind list because they are used to babysitting others on getting these items completed. Speak with a criminal defense attorney about such concerns. Your probation officer is just a person with a job to do. The easier you make it for them to supervise you, the less likely he or she will bring any violations to the attention of the judge. Similarly, you’ll need a favorable report from your officer to have your community supervision reduced or terminated early.

 

Never Violate the Terms of Your Community Supervision

 

If you don’t understand them or don’t agree with them, speak with an attorney. But whatever you do, don’t commit a violation. If you are required to check in monthly with your officer, do it. If you are required to pass drug tests, make sure you can. If you have to get permission to travel outside of the county or state, get permission in writing! If you violate any requirements, depending on the nature of the violation, your officer can bring it to the attention of the judge who can then revoke your community supervision and impose the full sentence. Community supervision is much higher stakes than a pending case because the Judge already has enough evidence to sentence you to jail or prison; you really can’t afford to make a mistake.

 

Pay Fines and Fees on Time

 

Community supervision is expensive. You’ll have to pay monthly supervision fees, court fines, payments to CrimeStoppers and other costs. Pay them on time and as soon as you can. If you can’t pay in full, tell your probation officer. Many people run into trouble when they can’t pay their fines and fees, which are sometimes exorbitant. They are an unfortunate—yet often unavoidable—component of community supervision. However, the one condition of community supervision that you have a defense for not doing is paying fines or fees. That doesn’t mean that you don’t have to pay them, it just means that if a judge believes you did not have the ability to pay, they will not send you to jail or prison. There is not a similar statutory defense for all the other conditions of community supervision.

 

Complete Community Supervision Requirements Early

 

You can make a good impression—and make your officer’s job easier—if you complete the requirements of your community supervision early. If you are required to complete a certain number of hours of community service each month, complete them early. If you have to take classes, sign up for them as soon as you can. The less your officer has to do to supervise you, the better off you’ll be. Remember no skylining! If your officer is constantly having to follow up with you due to missed deadlines and unfulfilled requirements, expect no leniency.

 

Apply for Early Release

 

Qualified probationers may file a motion to have their community supervision terminated early. You must serve one-third of your supervision period or two years, whichever is sooner, to even be considered. Serving at least one-half, however, is recommended. Early release is entirely discretionary. The judge generally won’t grant your request if you have any violations, haven’t fulfilled the requirements of your community supervision or otherwise made a poor impression on your officer.

 

One Last Suggestion…

 

This probably doesn’t qualify as a tip, but the best thing you can do is to avoid community supervision altogether. If you are still in a position to do so, consult with an experienced Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney with a good track record of dismissals. Community supervision is rarely your best option. Work closely with a criminal defense attorney to learn about what your options are and how you can avoid the immense burden of community supervision.

 

If you’re facing criminal charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action so you can move on with your life. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

 

The Problem With Ticket Surcharges in Texas

The Problem With Ticket Surcharges in Texas

How Much Will It Cost?

 

Fines for traffic tickets are an unexpected cost no one likes to pay. Unfortunately, the true cost of a traffic ticket in Texas doesn’t stop at the imposed fine. In addition to the court-imposed fine and court costs you will receive for a traffic ticket, the Texas Department of Public Safety may also impose a surcharge under the Driver Responsibility Program.

 

Ticket surcharges are fees you have to pay to keep your license valid. They are in addition to the initial fine for the offense. The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) assesses surcharges for points on your driving record and certain convictions. DPS surcharges are assessed annually for three years. On top of the assessed surcharges, you may have to pay additional service fees, and fees for payment plans (you only get one chance at a payment plan with DPS so make sure it is one that you can live with, otherwise a default will leave you with the option of paying the entire amount in full) or specific payment methods.

 

For Some, the Cost Is Too High

 

Texas ticket surcharges have been under intense scrutiny in recent years. Many argue they disproportionately affect the poor, who often rely on their licenses to get to work and make a living. Failing to pay your surcharges in full or arrange for a payment plan will result in a license suspension. So, if you can’t afford to pay your surcharges, you lose your license and potentially your livelihood. You’ll also face continued surcharges if you drive on your suspended license after that point. In this light, the surcharges perpetuate a cycle, one that is extremely hard to break without significant costs.

 

Can You Afford Ticket Surcharges in Texas?

 

The Texas Driver Responsibility Program can turn an ordinary traffic ticket into a financial burden. But for Texans working hard to make ends meet, one missed surcharge payment can put their very livelihood at risk.

Now that you know how Texas ticket surcharges work, you can easily see how one traffic ticket can end up being a costly mistake. The original fine, annual surcharges and associated fees and increased insurance rates add up quickly. The good news is you can fight your ticket in court. Speak with an experienced Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney who handles traffic ticket cases to determine whether you want to risk paying costly surcharges for years and potentially lose your license or fight your ticket. An attorney can fight your ticket in court to save your license and help you avoid ticket surcharges, in some cases for less than what your original fine was.

 

If you have a traffic ticket and need a legal advocate in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action to minimize the consequences of your ticket. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

How to Quickly Lift a Texas Warrant

How to Quickly Lift a Texas Warrant

First Steps to Deal With Your Warrant

 

Many people panic when they find out they have an outstanding warrant. Even if your warrant is for unpaid traffic tickets, police can arrest you at any time and any place.

Warrants are not easy to resolve or “lift.” While you may have many options for doing so, each of those options comes with pros and cons. You could easily choose the wrong option for your case and suffer the consequences.

In some cases, those consequences can end up costing you much more than the ticket itself. Thus, you should always work with a seasoned Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney if you have a warrant. An experienced attorney can learn about your case and lift your warrant quickly and cost-effectively. Review this basic information on lifting Texas warrants to increase the productivity of your meeting with your attorney.

 

You can lift your warrant with a number of methods.

 

Do Jail Time

 

Many people mistakenly believe doing jail time instead of paying their ticket will be the cheapest way to lift the warrant. Some people even think this is their only option if they can’t afford to pay their expensive ticket. In reality, doing jail time is the equivalent of pleading guilty to the offense. It may have the indirect result of resolving your warrant, but it doesn’t save you from the other penalties associated with the offense, and some Class C convictions have very expensive surcharges and/or suspensions associated with them.

 

Pay the Ticket

 

You can also pay your ticket to lift the warrant. But paying the ticket is also seen as a guilty plea. So, once you pay the ticket and lift the warrant, you can be subject to more penalties, including surcharges. If you fail to pay those surcharges or miss a payment, your license can be suspended.

 

Post a Cash Bond

 

Another option is to request a new court date. To do this, you may have to pay a cash bond. But this is a high-risk move. If you miss your new court date, even accidentally, you forfeit the cash bond amount and are right back to square one.

 

Hire an Attorney to Post a Surety Bond

 

The best option is to hire an attorney to post a surety bond on your behalf. This lifts the warrant and reinstates the case on the court’s docket, and you have someone knowledgeable to appear for you in court to obtain the best deal for you, which may be to have the case dismissed! Moreover, you don’t have to take time out of your busy schedule to appear in court; the attorney does that for you!!

 

 

If you have a warrant in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email clients@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

3 Reasons to Fight Assault Family Violence Charges

3 Reasons to Fight Assault Family Violence Charges

Why You Should Defend Yourself

 

Assault family violence charges are very serious. The consequences of an assault family violence conviction are far-reaching. Thus, you should not take them lightly. No matter the degree of the offense, an assault family violence conviction can result in severe penalties. Specifically, here are three reasons why you should always fight family violence charges.

 

Court-Imposed Penalties

 

Texas courts aggressively prosecute family violence offenders. Defendants face a lifetime of legal and social repercussions for a conviction. A first assault family violence conviction is a Class A misdemeanor and is punishable by:

 

  • Up to 365 days in county jail, and/or
  • A fine of up to $4,000
  • Illegal under Federal law to possess firearms
  • Unable to Expunge or Seal the case from the public
  • Any future assault family violence charges can be enhanced to a felony (including Class C)

 

The judge can also order you to pay victim restitution. Restitution compensates the victim for costs associated with the incident, such as medical bills or counseling. The judge may also probate your sentence, giving you probation or “community supervision” instead of the maximum sentence.

 

These penalties aren’t the only reasons why you should fight an assault family violence charge. The penalties for a second assault family violence conviction increase significantly. You can be charged with continuous family violence for a second assault family violence conviction in one year. Continuous family violence is a third-degree felony, punishable by up to ten years in prison and/or a fine of up to $10,000.

 

Subject to a Protective Order

 

In some assault family violence cases, the judge will issue an Emergency Protective Order (EPO). EPOs are also known as a “stay away” orders. EPOs and their long-term counterparts (Protective Orders) restrict the restrained person in many ways. Most notably, the restrained person is prohibited from contacting or coming near the victim or the victim’s family. Violation of a Protective Order is a criminal offense and can result in jail time and additional penalties. EPOs are typically short in duration, from between 31 and 91 days. Final Protective Orders can last up to two years.

 

Loss of Your Family

 

If convicted of assault family violence, you may suffer social consequences as well. You could lose custody of your children, be prevented from entering your home and lose respect in your community. These effects can be even more deleterious than criminal penalties and can affect you for years to come.

 

Never underestimate the consequences of an assault family violence conviction. Do not let the court convict you without a fight, and for assault family violence cases deferred equals a conviction. The first step to fighting your assault family violence charges is to speak with an attorney about your case. The specific facts and circumstances of your offense will significantly influence your options for fighting your charges or receiving a reduced sentence or even an outright dismissal.  The overwhelming supermajority of assault family violence cases that we handle result in dismissals.

 

 

Are you facing charges of assault family violence in the Dallas-Fort Worth area? If so, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email clients@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

Texas DWI: What’s the Worst That Can Happen?

Texas DWI: What’s the Worst That Can Happen?

Facing the Penalties

 

If you’ve been arrested for a DWI in Texas, you face many life-altering consequences. If you’re thinking, “what’s the worst that can happen?” you are being sensible. The best thing you can do when facing any criminal charge is to find out what penalties the court could impose, so you can make informed decisions about how to handle your case. And when it comes to DWI charges in Texas, those penalties can be severe. Let’s take a look.

 

Texas DWI

 

DWI in Texas is a Class B misdemeanor. The penalties imposed for a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) conviction in Texas include:

 

  • A fine of up to $2,000
  • Between three and 180 days in jail
  • A driver’s license suspension of between 90 and 365 days, and
  • A surcharge fee of $1,000 to maintain your license (assessed annually for three years)

 

This range of court-imposed penalties is for a first offense with no aggravating circumstances. The penalties increase significantly if:

 

  • You have a prior DWI conviction
  • Your BAC (blood alcohol concentration) was equal to or greater than .15
  • You had an open container of alcohol in the car
  • You caused an accident or property damage
  • You injured or killed someone
  • You had a child passenger with you while driving

 

A Note on Probation

 

Some defendants may receive probation instead of a full sentence. But beware because probation is costly. The terms of a standard Texas DWI probation may include:

 

  • Commit no other crimes
  • Payment of all fines and court costs (fines generally run around $1,000 and court costs are around $450, but payment schedules are allowed)
  • Report to probation once a month for 18 to 24 months
  • Pay $60 a month in probation fees ($60 x 18 = $1,080)
  • Take a 12-hour DWI education program ($150)
  • Attend a MADD Victim Impact Panel (VIP)($50)
  • Take a drug and alcohol evaluation ($150)
  • 24 to 40 hours of community service restitution ($50)
  • Pay $25 to Crime Stoppers
  • Do not leave the state without permission
  • Do not spend the night outside of Dallas County
  • Do not move (relocate) without court permission
  • Submit to periodic drug testing (about $35 per test)
  • Consume no alcohol
  • Keep an interlock device in your vehicle ($80 per month), and
  • Have a SCRAM device on your leg ($360 a month!)

 

We typically do not recommend that someone take probation for a first-time DWI because the total costs can run about $4500. Also, there is little benefit with regard to a person’s record; probation and jail time are both considered criminal convictions in Texas.

 

Texas DWI penalties can be severe. The good news is juries give many first-time offenders reduced sentences. In some cases, the jury will give someone the minimum punishment possible which may be either 72 hours in jail or 0 days in jail depending on the charge.

 

This sounds counterintuitive to what you might have heard, right? For this reason, you should always consult with a seasoned Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney when facing DWI charges. We’ve represented clients who have completed a short jail sentence and probation. Guess what they tell us? If they had it to do over again, they would take the short jail sentence so that the case is finished instead of spending 12-24 months of their life under the government’s thumb, jumping through a bunch of hoops. The sooner you involve an attorney, the better your chance of minimizing your punishment. Plus, by going to trial on the case you may be found not guilty which means there is no punishment and you can immediately remove the arrest and charge from your record. That’s the outcome you really want!

 

 

If you’re facing DWI charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email clients@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

 

Class A and Class B Texas Misdemeanors: Potential Penalties

Class A and Class B Texas Misdemeanors: Potential Penalties

Crime Classes

 

Many people think of misdemeanors as less serious than felony crimes. But misdemeanors still have the potential to carry harsh sentences including incarceration and steep fines. Texas misdemeanors are divided into classes or offense categories. These classes represent the seriousness of the crime, and, accordingly, carry different ranges of punishments. Let’s take a look at Class A and Class B Texas misdemeanors and the potential penalties they hold.

 

Statutory Punishments for Texas Misdemeanors

 

Class A Texas misdemeanors are punishable by:

  • Up to one year in a local or county jail, and/or
  • A fine of up to $4,000

 

Class B Texas misdemeanors are punishable by:

  • Up to 180 days in a local or county jail, and/or
  • A fine of up to $2,000

 

Not Set in Stone

 

These are the maximum allowable punishments according to Texas law. Note, however, these are not necessarily mandatory or minimum punishments. It is not uncommon for a first-time offender to receive less jail time, a lower fine or one or the other. In some cases, you may be able to get community supervision (i.e. probation) in lieu of incarceration. But misdemeanor probation in Texas involves a host of strict terms and conditions. Probation is also expensive due to numerous fines and fees the defendant must pay. Many defendants who take probation later regret their choice. For this reason, you should always work closely with an experienced Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney when facing Class A or Class B Texas misdemeanors so that you can make the best decision about how you want to handle your case.

 

A Third Class

 

Texas also has Class C misdemeanors, which are punishable by a fine of up to $500 but no jail time. These include lesser offenses such as traffic violations and some types of theft. Because these are less serious, sometimes people make the mistake of not taking them seriously. But to avoid the negative consequences of a conviction, you should take every Texas misdemeanor charge seriously.

 

Making Informed Decisions

 

Facing misdemeanor charges can be overwhelming. It’s normal to feel apprehensive about the fines and incarceration the court can impose. These are all very real concerns because the criminal court system is rarely lenient or easy to navigate. To face your charges with confidence, you should speak with a Texas criminal defense attorney with experience handling misdemeanor cases. A seasoned attorney can immediately set to work to minimize the consequences of your charges.

 

If you’re facing misdemeanor charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email clients@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.