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Search and Seizure

JBABB Criminal Defense Attorneys > Search and Seizure

Pros and Cons of Breath and Blood Tests

Pros and Cons of Breath and Blood Tests

In most cases, law enforcement will ask you to submit to a BAC (blood alcohol concentration) test when arresting you for a DWI in Texas. Typically, the arresting officer must inform you of the consequences if you refuse a breath test, including a mandatory license suspension and the potential of a warrant to take your blood by force. Increasingly, people are refusing the breathalyzer test in favor of the blood test because they’ve heard the breath test is the less reliable of the two. Unfortunately, neither the blood or breath BAC tests are foolproof, but each has its pros and cons. Making the right decision when arrested for a DWI takes understanding both.

 

Breath Tests

 

Breath chemical tests are taken using a breathalyzer device. They analyze samples of “deep lung” or alveolar air from the alleged offender’s breath. The science behind breathalyzers assumes the evaporated alcohol in your breath is a direct reflection of that in your bloodstream, meaning the results are viewed interchangeably. In reality, breath tests are generally less accurate than blood tests because they do not directly measure blood alcohol content. Instead, they measure breath alcohol. They are also not conducted by trained laboratory professionals, as blood tests are.

 

Many factors can produce false positives in breath tests, such as your state of health, what medications you take, what you recently consumed or even what type of diet you are on. The unfortunate truth is if you submit to a breath test, the results might not be reliable. A seasoned Texas DWI attorney can usually challenge breath test results, however, as there are many known weaknesses in breath test science.

 

Blood Tests

 

Blood tests are run using a blood sample from the alleged offender. Blood draws are supposed to be taken by trained personnel in a laboratory environment. They must also be preserved, stored and analyzed according to a certain procedure. These stringent standards reduce the risk of degradation or contamination of the sample. Because BAC can be directly measured using a blood sample, many argue blood tests are more accurate and thus should be chosen over breath tests. It’s true; blood tests eliminate some of the varying factors that can produce false positives in breath tests. It may be more difficult, however, to challenge blood test results if you think they are inaccurate.

 

While neither the breath or the blood BAC test is 100% accurate, the good news is, regardless of which you took, an attorney might be able to help challenge the results. In an ideal situation, it’s best to consult with a Dallas DWI defense attorney before agreeing to submit to a breath or blood test. If you already took one or refused to submit to one, speak with a highly experienced Dallas DWI defense attorney about the consequences. Again, blood draws can be forced in some instances. Also, you face an automatic license suspension if you refuse to submit to a test. Discuss the details of your case with a DWI defense attorney to learn about the consequences you could face and how you can challenge the results of a BAC test.

 

If you need help fighting your DWI charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will help you aggressively fight your charges. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

 

Defining Possession in Texas Drug Cases

Defining Possession in Texas Drug Cases

Drug Possession Defined

 

Drug possession is a serious charge in Texas, bringing with it the potential for prison time and enormous fines. Due to the gravity of this type of charge, it’s vital to thoroughly understand every element of the crime as the court interprets it. Only from there can you build a strong defense. Let’s take a look at how Texas law defines possession of a controlled substance.

 

Under Texas statute, a person commits the offense of possession of a controlled substance if he or she:

 

Knowingly or intentionally possesses a controlled substance, unless the person obtained the substance directly from or under a valid prescription or order from a practitioner acting in the course of professional practice.

 

Now that you know the legal definition of possession of a controlled substance let’s review a few examples that illustrate this definition.

 

John obtained a prescription drug from his doctor at his doctor’s office. While the prescription was for a narcotic pain reliever, he cannot be charged with possession of a controlled substance.

 

The police found drugs in Jane’s car, but they were in her friend’s purse, which she left in Jane’s car by accident. Jane’s attorney could argue she did not knowingly or intentionally possess controlled substances.

 

Sam was found in possession of a controlled substance and claimed he had a valid prescription. In reality, his prescription was phony, which his friend who just graduated medical school wrote for him. Sam knew the prescription was fraudulent but filled it anyway. Sam could be charged with possession of a controlled substance.

 

The police found Mary with a controlled substance on her person. She did not have a valid prescription, and she mistakenly admitted it was hers during the arrest. Mary could be found guilty of possession of a controlled substance.

 

A Drug Possession Defense Attorney Can Defend Your Rights

 

Every possession of a controlled substance case is different. The facts and circumstances of your offense can significantly impact the consequences. Call a Dallas-Fort Worth drug crime defense attorney immediately if you are facing drug possession charges. An attorney may be able to fight your charges depending on the specifics of your case. The penalties for possession of a controlled substance are severe and vary greatly depending on the penalty group. Don’t face these charges alone. Find an advocate who knows how to defend this type of case.

 

 

If you are facing charges for possession of a controlled substance in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on how to defend your rights. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

Home Illegally Searched? Here’s What You Can Do

Home Illegally Searched? Here’s What You Can Do

What Are Your Protections?

 

The US Constitution protects us from unreasonable search and seizure, meaning the authorities cannot search your person or property without good cause. Nevertheless, police illegally search people and their homes every day. If the police searched your home unlawfully, here’s what you can do.

 

Determine the Legality

 

First, speak with an attorney to determine whether the police illegally searched your home. Unfortunately, Texas laws lend police officers significant discretion when it comes to searching and obtaining evidence. That said, the police do not necessarily need to show you a warrant to enter and search your home. A police officer can enter your home without a warrant under exigent (i.e. emergency) circumstances. Typically, they do this when they need to provide assistance or aid to someone in the domicile to protect his or her life.

 

Exceptions and Exemptions

 

An officer may also conduct a warrantless search with probable cause, pursuant to an arrest, if they reasonably believe the suspect is about to destroy evidence in the home, when in “hot pursuit” of a suspect or when doing a protective sweep of the home to ensure there are no people or weapons that could potentially endanger the officer.

 

Fighting Back

 

If you and your attorney determine you are a victim of an illegal search of your home, you can take steps to exercise your rights. Specifically, you can petition the court to have any unlawfully seized property released to you. You can also file a motion to suppress evidence, which is relatively common in criminal cases. If you are facing charges, and the prosecuting attorney has evidence that law enforcement illegally obtained, your attorney can request the court “suppress” it, meaning that evidence cannot be used against you.

 

Police make mistakes. They also can make poor judgment calls. And when they do, they might conduct a search unlawfully. But the power of law enforcement does not have to go unchecked. If your home was illegally searched, or if you want to learn about your rights, speak with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney promptly. Involving an attorney early on in these types of cases is essential if you want to stand up and defend your rights.

 

If you’re facing criminal charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on your rights and help you protect them. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

Blood Alcohol Concentration: Why It’s Tested and How It Affects Your Case

Blood Alcohol Concentration: Why It’s Tested and How It Affects Your Case

Measuring Blood Alcohol Concentration

 

Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is a measurement of the percent of alcohol in your blood by volume. Typically, BAC is assessed using a breath or blood test. In Texas, a BAC of .08% is the threshold of legal intoxication. Thus, if you are caught driving with a BAC of .08% or higher, you can face charges for driving while intoxicated (DWI.) Other methods of assessing intoxication, such as field sobriety tests, are far more subjective. Because blood alcohol theory is backed by science, the criminal court system relies heavily on these tests results when prosecuting DWI cases.

 

Accurate or Approximate?

 

To generalize, BAC test results serve as evidence of intoxication (or lack thereof). Indeed, BAC test results can make some cases appear open and shut. Many drivers who “blow” a .08% or higher on a breathalyzer test convince themselves there is no hope. In reality, BAC test results are not infallible. The method through which the test is administered, the equipment or materials used to collect the sample and the analysis procedure can impact the accuracy and reliability of BAC tests.

 

The BAC Test

 

In most cases, Texas law enforcement will require a DWI suspect to submit to a BAC test either by providing a “deep lung” air sample via a breathalyzer machine or by a blood draw, which is obtained and analyzed in a lab. Refusing to submit to a BAC test has consequences under Texas’ implied consent law. The implied consent law requires all drivers arrested for a DWI to submit to a BAC test, also called a chemical test. If you refuse, you will potentially face an automatic license suspension, separate from any court-imposed license suspension for a conviction. However, if you request a hearing within 15 days of refusing to submit to either a breath or blood test, then your license may not be suspended. Also, law enforcement can obtain a warrant from a magistrate ordering you to provide a blood sample. A refusal to submit to a blood draw in compliance with a warrant permits law enforcement to withdraw your blood using force, if necessary, so it is highly recommended that you submit to a blood draw after law enforcement has obtained a warrant and presented it to you. You can always challenge the probable cause for obtaining the warrant at a later date.

 

No Matter Your BAC, an Experienced Attorney Can Help

 

Refusing to take a BAC test can limit the evidence the prosecution has to use against you in your case. However, your refusal to submit to a test will result in an automatic license suspension. And, it’s crucial to understand that even in absence of a BAC test, you can still be convicted. The prosecution has to prove you were driving while intoxicated, and there are other, albeit less objective, methods to accomplish this. Due to these factors, it’s vital you work closely with a highly experienced Dallas-Fort Worth DWI defense attorney if you are facing DWI charges. Even if you think you are as good as guilty, an attorney can probably point out you have more options and leverage than you think.

 

If you’re facing DWI or DUI charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action to fight your charges. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

Car Searches: When They’re Legal and When They’re Not

Car Searches: When They’re Legal and When They’re Not

Search Standards

 

Typically, law enforcement must have a warrant to search your person or property. Cars present a unique exception where police don’t necessarily need a search warrant for numerous reasons. Because vehicles are mobile, law enforcement might not have a reasonable amount of time to obtain a warrant before the “property” (i.e. the car) is gone. Likewise, because traffic stops are conducted on public roadways, the driver should not have an expectation for the kind of privacy of one’s own home. This expectation of privacy is a key legal test used to uphold the Fourth Amendment, which protects us from warrantless search and seizure. For these reasons, law enforcement can potentially conduct legal car searches without a warrant under the following circumstances.

 

Probable Cause and Car Searches

 

Like any situation where police want to conduct a search, whether or not a warrant is needed, the police must have probable cause, which is a reasonable suspicion a crime has been, is being or is about to be committed. For example, if a police officer sees drug paraphernalia in plain sight in the vehicle, he or she could have a reasonable suspicion that criminal activity had, was or was about to take place. In light of reasonable suspicion, law enforcement could potentially conduct a legal search of a vehicle without a warrant.

 

Consent

 

An officer may conduct legal car searches—or search of any property—with the driver’s consent. If a police officer asks you to provide consent, and it’s wise to always say NO and then invoke your right to remain silent. Saying NO does not indicate guilt, and it can protect your rights. A word of caution: do so politely!

 

 

After an Arrest

 

Police may potentially search a car without a warrant incident to an arrest. However, the suspect must be unsecured and have the potential to access what is in the car. An officer may also conduct a search if he or she believes there could be evidence in the car related to the arrest.

 

Presence of Weapons

 

If an officer can view weapons in the car in plain sight, he or she may conduct a legal search if he or she believes the suspect could be dangerous and access the weapons.

 

Taking Inventory

 

After a car is legally impounded, an officer may perform what is called an “inventory search” to inventory the contents of the car, according to standard policy.

 

Protect Your Constitutional Rights; Call an Attorney

 

In the absence of one of these scenarios, a law enforcement officer cannot conduct a legal car search. If police search your car, you should consult with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney about your rights. Explain the circumstances of the search in detail. A seasoned attorney will be able to advise you on whether the search was likely legal or not and what you can do if your car was illegally searched and evidence was seized. Typically, evidence unlawfully seized can potentially be inadmissible at trial.

 

 

If you’re facing criminal charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on your rights and help you protect them. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

Was There Reasonable Suspicion for Your DWI Stop?

Was There Reasonable Suspicion for Your DWI Stop?

Cause and Effect

 

The Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution protects you from unreasonable search and seizure. Essentially, this protection requires law enforcement to have “probable cause“ or reasonable suspicion to search your person or property or seize anything in your possession. Even in the realm of traffic stops, law enforcement must have reasonable suspicion to pull you over. But what is reasonable suspicion? And what is reasonable suspicion for a DWI stop? Answering these simple questions can help you protect your rights.

 

A Reasonable Suspicion

 

Reasonable suspicion is a specific articulable basis for believing that a crime may have been, was being committed, or will be committed soon. A law enforcement officer must have reasonable suspicion to pull you over, but it could be any violation. For example, an officer could pull you over for failing to signal at a turn, but that stop could easily turn into a DWI arrest. In fact, police sometimes make “pretext” stops where they pull you over for a traffic violation but intend to look for evidence of intoxication. As long as the officer witnesses an infraction, no matter how minor, he or she has enough reasonable suspicion to stop you. An officer can also stop you for swerving between lanes, driving too fast or too slow, stopping before stop lights or making wide turns, all possible signs of DWI.

 

Because reasonable suspicion is an essential element in DWI cases, you should get a copy of the police report as soon as you can. The cause for the stop should be noted in the report. Go over the police report with an attorney to ensure the officer lawfully pulled you over.

 

Defending Your Rights

 

Unfortunately, police have been known to prey on drivers by following cars that leave bars. They are looking for a reason, any reason, to stop you, but their true intention may be to arrest you for a DWI. With this in mind, it’s vital you carefully examine every fact in your case to ensure your rights weren’t violated. Have a Texas DWI defense attorney review the police report to help you determine whether the arresting officer violated your rights and what you can do about it.

 

 

If you’re facing DWI charges in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

Facing Drug Possession Penalties in Texas? Follow These First Steps

Facing Drug Possession Penalties in Texas? Follow These First Steps

Drug possession penalties in Texas are severe. One misstep can leave you facing years of incarceration and insurmountable fines. Factors such as the type of drug and the quantity you possessed can mean the difference between a few years behind bars or life. Thus, if you are facing drug possession charges of any kind in Texas, here are some essential first steps you should take.

Connect With an Attorney

No one facing charges for possession of a controlled substance in Texas should do so without a criminal defense attorney. The potential consequences are too great. You should work with a legal professional to formulate the strategies you may need to employ to fight your charges or minimize the burden of the outcome of your case.

Analyze Evidence

It’s important to keep in mind that in drug possession cases, evidence can play a significant role. But evidence is sometimes fleeting and thus needs to be preserved. It can be seized by law enforcement, destroyed or disappear. Likewise, witness testimony can be of immense help but only if you contact and question witnesses soon after the incident in question. It’s best to bring a skilled Dallas-Fort Worth drug possession defense attorney on board to help you manage your case and obtain crucial pieces of evidence for a strong defense.

Abstain from Drugs and Alcohol

Pending the resolution of your case, it’s important to remain sober. Even one small mistake made when facing charges for another offense can ruin any hope of a positive outcome. Likewise, if you are convicted or placed on deferred adjudication with community supervision (i.e. probation), you will most likely be required to take and pass periodic drug tests. You may or may not be given notice before you have to take these. And lastly, staying committed to sobriety—even while your case is still pending—can demonstrate to the court that you have realized the consequences of your actions. This realization, if genuine, could potentially work in your favor. In fact, some prosecutors will agree to dismiss a case if you can pass a drug test on the day of court. There is no guarantee that this offer will be made to you, but you need to be ready if it does. There are even some judges that will test you on the date of a plea to see if you can pass a drug test; obviously not being able to do so does not help your case. Bottom line: no drugs or alcohol while the case is pending!

Drug Possession Penalties in Texas Can Be Life-Altering

Facing drug possession charges is frightening considering what is at stake. The good news is you do not have to face them alone. A skilled drug possession defense attorney in the Dallas-Fort Worth area can work to minimize the burden of your case outcome. Hiring an attorney is a personal choice and one you should make when informed. At the very least, discuss the drug possession penalties in Texas with an attorney before you make any decisions in your case.

If you are facing charges for possession of a controlled substance in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action given your circumstances. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

Punishment for Drug Possession: Why Quantity and Penalty Group Matter

Punishment for Drug Possession: Why Quantity and Penalty Group Matter

Simple Drug Possession Isn’t Simple

 

The State of Texas maintains some of this nation’s strictest drug possession laws. In Texas, you can face long periods of incarceration and steep fines for even simple drug possession charges. Drug possession offenses vary by the drug type—also called the penalty group or “schedule”—and the quantity, or the amount you had. These factors provide guidelines for how to charge and sentence offenders.

 

Quantity and Type

 

The law divides controlled substances into types or “schedules” that classify drugs based on numerous factors, such as the potential for misuse and dependency. Under the Texas Health and Safety Code, possession of a controlled substance is punishable by:

 

  • A minimum of confinement in jail for no more than 180 days, a fine of up to $2,000 or both.
  • A maximum of confinement under the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for no less than ten years and no more than 99 years or life and a fine of up to $100,000.

 

As you can see, the punishment range is vast. The type (i.e. penalty group) and the quantity of the drug are the two factors that determine whether you will get just a fine or up to life in prison. There are four main drug penalty groups. For example, penalty group one contains substances like opiates (synthetic and natural) and penalty group 4 contains substances like over the counter cough remedies. The quantity factor is measured in grams, ounces, pounds, tons or “abuse units,” depending on the specific drug type. For example, drugs in penalty group one are measured in grams.

 

Most forms of simple possession of controlled substances in small amounts (again, relative to the type) are state jail felonies. Possession of more significant amounts in type-specific units of measurement is punishable by much longer sentences in addition to exorbitant fines.

 

Penalties for Possession of a Controlled Substance

 

 

The penalties for drug possession in Texas are nothing to laugh about. For this reason, you need to speak with a Dallas-Fort Worth drug charge defense attorney experienced in handling drug cases if you are facing possession charges or any drug-related charge. An attorney can evaluate the facts and circumstances of your offense and walk you through the potential penalties you could face. A conviction for drug possession can result in a long incarceration period in addition to huge fines, so it’s well worth your time to consult with a knowledgeable attorney to learn about what you can do to fight your charges.

 

If you are facing charges for possession of a controlled substance in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys will advise you on the best course of action given your circumstances. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collin, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email team@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.

 

Demystifying Texas Drug Cases and Search and Seizure Laws

Demystifying Texas Drug Cases and Search and Seizure Laws

Know Your Rights

 

The U.S. Constitution protects you from unreasonable search and seizure. Law enforcement routinely searches people and their property to seize valuable evidence. This is particularly common in drug cases. Search and seizure remains a large component of law enforcement protocol. When investigating drug cases, obtaining evidence is of utmost priority. Texas has very strict controlled substance laws with severe penalties. The consequences of drug possession can vary widely based on the substance, the quantity, the context and the defendant’s criminal history. Thus, it’s essential to thoroughly understand search and seizure laws when facing drug charges.

 

Following Protocol

 

Typically, a police officer must have a warrant signed by a judge to search your person or property. If police conduct a search without a valid warrant, a judge may rule the evidence seized is inadmissible in court. Inadmissible evidence cannot be held against you.

 

But there are situations where law enforcement cannot obtain a warrant in a reasonable amount of time to apprehend suspects or seize evidence. The law provides police officer certain situations where they can perform a search without a warrant, including:

 

  • The officer saw the defendant commit the crime then conceal the evidence
  • The officer must enter private property to continue the pursuit of a suspect
  • The officer checks for weapons to ensure officer safety during a stop
  • The officer is arresting the subject and must search for weapons and contraband

 

Outside of these situations, there are very few instances in which a law enforcement officer may search your person or property and seize evidence in your possession.

 

Factors in Drug Cases

 

In drug possession or possession of drug paraphernalia cases, search and seizure laws are fundamental. It’s crucial to understand your rights and protections under the law, especially when facing a possession charge. One of those protections is freedom from unreasonable search and seizure.

 

Speak with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney if you think a law enforcement officer illegally searched you or your property. An attorney can evaluate the facts and circumstances of your case and advise you on whether the officer performed an illegal search. If so, the attorney can file a Motion to Suppress evidence in your case. Suppressing evidence can significantly weaken the prosecution’s argument. In some cases, this results in the case being dismissed altogether.

 

If you are facing drug charges in Dallas-Fort Worth, JBabb – Criminal Defense Attorneys is here to help. JBabb Criminal Defense Attorneys can aggressively protect your rights. With law offices in Dallas and Denton, our attorneys provide compassionate legal services to Dallas, Collins, Denton, Ellis, Rockwall and Tarrant counties. Our experienced attorneys handle a wide variety of criminal cases including DWI/DUI, assault/family violence, and other misdemeanors and felonies. Call (214) 329-9433, email clients@jbabblaw.com, or fill out our confidential online form to schedule a consultation with a Dallas-Fort Worth criminal defense attorney.